Sally Porter's Web Log
Picasso's Portrait of Olga in an Armchair, 1917, and Klimt 
Tuesday, November 24, 2009, 08:42 AM - General
Posted by Administrator
Picasso's Portrait of Olga in an Armchair, 1917, is another example of his respect for pattern. Olga's face is treated with great sensitivity, but she is there to showcase the luscious pattern of flowers and leaves on the fabric beside her. Like a model on a game show, she is there to point to the lovely prize. Notice how her right arm is draped around the top of the cloth and her left hand points to the bottom of the cloth, encasing it completely within a field of devotion.

This portrait reminds me of Klimt's Portrait of Margaret Stonborough-Wittgenstein, which was painted around 1905. As in many of Klimt's pieces, the woman is there to accentuate the beautiful pattern of both fabric and background.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery
www.sallyportergallery.com

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all
view entry ( 712 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 3 / 792 )
William Blake and Meta Expressionism 
Thursday, November 19, 2009, 01:45 PM - General
Posted by Administrator
William Blake was an artistic genius who delved into his internal framework to produce works of lasting power. He drew upon his personal values and understandings of broader cultural references, relying on his own imaginings to produce masterpieces like Pity, The Body of Abel Found by Adam and Eve, and Ancient of Days. With one foot anchored in these common reference points, he brought to light the great reality of his imagination, bridging the gap between the known and the unknown, allowing us entry to the universe of visionaries.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery
www.sallyportergallery.com

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all
view entry ( 519 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 3 / 565 )
Porter's Purple Leaves 
Saturday, November 7, 2009, 03:51 PM - General
Posted by Administrator
If you visit the Sally Porter Gallery room, Passion: Flowers and Leaves, you can view the piece Purple Leaves. An array of various leaves painted in lush purples creates a topographic garden of the mind. Geometric squares and rectangles of white suggest bursts and glimmers of light in this internal landscape. The greens suggest grass and shade surrounded by deep purple decorative leaves, a grape cluster and even a palm tree.

The painting creates the multi-present sensation of being in different places at the same time: at the beach, in a grove of lilacs, underneath an oak, in a city or by a river. A sense of tranquility and happiness pervades the picture.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery
www.sallyportergallery.com
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all
view entry ( 440 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 3 / 790 )
Picasso's Dryad (1908) 
Thursday, November 5, 2009, 08:00 AM - General
Posted by Administrator
Picasso's Dryad (1908) can best be described as the Terminator of the forest. According to dictionary.com, a dryad is a wood nymph or "deity of the woods" in classical mythology. This female form is primal instead of futuristic, but all the power of super human strength is present.

She stomps through the woods, one hand fashioned as a club, searching the trees for something to destroy. Her semi-featureless face cast in partial shadow conveys a sense of doom. The blacked out eye sockets and heavy wooden body tell us this deity will show no mercy. She is forever searching the moonlit woods.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery

www.sallyportergallery.com
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all

view entry ( 467 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 3 / 125 )
Child Holding a Dove by Picasso 
Wednesday, November 4, 2009, 10:49 AM - General
Posted by Administrator
In 1901, Picasso painted Child Holding a Dove. He was 20 years old at the time he created this piece, and the painting shows a tender side of the artist. One of Picasso's most formidable talents was his ability to show great depth and range of emotion. In his work, he is in turns lusty, intelligent, passionate, angry, contemplative, etc., but not usually tender. Perhaps this piece could only have been created while Picasso himself was young and not yet jaded.

In the painting, the child is portrayed as innocence itself. Even the bird is captivated by the child's charm, nestled close, almost touching the lips. The child looks directly and assuredly at the viewer, a keeper of hidden knowledge.

One can lose one's self in the beautiful color and loose brushwork of this painting.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery
www.sallyportergallery.com
sallyporter@sallyportergallery.com
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all
view entry ( 445 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 3 / 793 )

<< <Back | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | Next> >>