Sally Porter's Web Log
Klimt's The Large Poplar (1903) 
Sunday, September 20, 2009, 07:48 PM - General
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Gustav Klimt is known for the patterns and remarkable color in his paintings, as well as his ability to paint the human figure in a transcendant universal way. His painting The Large Poplar (1903) does not have any of the brilliant color or any human figures, but here he paints a picture of the spirit world using nature as medium.

On the right side of the picture, the huge poplar tree rises up out of the land, the foliage looking like a gigantic cloud of swarming bees reaching to heaven. Above the lonely landscape, a grey sky of roiling clouds holds the misty white spirits. The one on the left is a ghostly vision of one of his models. The spectre of a male face with a mustache looms a third of the way down the picture next to the swarm of bees/leaves, and a skull is visible between the male and female spectres.

The spirit images emerging from the painter's psyche are the true coming storm in this painting.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery
www.sallyportergallery.com
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all
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Glass Facade by Paul Klee 
Wednesday, September 16, 2009, 11:25 AM - General
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Glass Facade was painted by Paul Klee in 1940. The spectacular color jumps out and grabs you. The piece simultaneously energizes and soothes, like a cup of outstanding herbal tea. The pure flat geometric shapes and black lines (mostly straight) make a statement of unmatched clarity. The colors are brilliant.

His title is misleading because there is no facade here, no fakery, no effort to distort, dilute or bury the visual message.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery
www.sallyportergallery.com
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all


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Klimt's Music (1901) 
Friday, July 31, 2009, 09:00 AM
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Gustav Klimt's 1901 woodcut titled Music (see www.passionforpaintings.it/search-by-color/fcd9a3/), is a striking piece of art. In this composiiton, a woman in Romanesque style dress plucks a lyre. The bottom portion of the work are two simple fields of color, the orange dress against the yellow ground, almost completely devoid of line. In contrast, the upper part of the piece emphasizes the strings on the front of the instrument, the arabesques of fabric on her sleeve and the spiral ornamentation in her dark hair.

On the wall behind the musician is a scene depicting the lower half of a figure dressed in a tunic and a water jar. This subtle detail, along with the lioness adorning the lyre, adds exotic flavor.

The classical imagery of the musician depicted with the purity of large, flat shapes and colors juxtaposed with the curved lines of the lyre itself and the angular shape created by the instrument pressed against the figure have iconic impact.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery
www.sallyportergallery.com
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all
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Klee's Women's Pavilion (1921) 
Thursday, July 30, 2009, 08:24 AM - General
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In Women's Pavilion (1921), Paul Klee creates an archetypal landscape with otherworldly inhabitants. The ground for the painting is dark and mysterious like the night. There are olive greens and velvet black rectangles overlaid with golden pyramids and scraped shapes of emerald green. Trees with leaves of vivid yellow green and brilliant red, along with trunks of orange, yellow and light blue, comprise a magical wood.

Two bottle-like figures stand in the foreground. Their heads, like great peacock plumes, fan upward from their thick necks. Crossing their bodies, necks and heads and continuing all the way up the painting are thin, wavy horizontal dotted lines adding a crosswind effect to the piece.

In the center of the work is a rectangular window looking onto a pyramid of yet another dimension of intrigue.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery
www.sallyportergallery.com
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all

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Picasso's The Two Saltimbanques (Harlequin and His Companion), 1901 
Wednesday, July 29, 2009, 08:47 AM - General
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Picasso's The Two Saltimbanques (1901) features two lovers at a nice restaurant. There are white tablecloths on the tables and decorative moldings on the walls. They are snuggling closely in the booth enjoying two libations, perhaps an absinthe and a dark creme de cacao, served in glass stemware.

The couple is dressed for a night out, but at different places. She in her gold and orange long-sleeved dress blends in perfectly with the other restaurant patrons. He, however, is dressed for the stage and an adoring public, in his green skull cap and harlequin costume. He is playing his part.

She has a look of sad detachment with her down turned mouth as she rests her head on her hands. His nail biting suggests a bit of apprehension as they each look out across the room in opposite directions just waiting for someone to notice them.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery
www.sallyportergallery.com
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all
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