Sally Porter's Web Log
Klimt's Music (1901) 
Friday, July 31, 2009, 09:00 AM
Posted by Administrator
Gustav Klimt's 1901 woodcut titled Music (see www.passionforpaintings.it/search-by-color/fcd9a3/), is a striking piece of art. In this composiiton, a woman in Romanesque style dress plucks a lyre. The bottom portion of the work are two simple fields of color, the orange dress against the yellow ground, almost completely devoid of line. In contrast, the upper part of the piece emphasizes the strings on the front of the instrument, the arabesques of fabric on her sleeve and the spiral ornamentation in her dark hair.

On the wall behind the musician is a scene depicting the lower half of a figure dressed in a tunic and a water jar. This subtle detail, along with the lioness adorning the lyre, adds exotic flavor.

The classical imagery of the musician depicted with the purity of large, flat shapes and colors juxtaposed with the curved lines of the lyre itself and the angular shape created by the instrument pressed against the figure have iconic impact.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery
www.sallyportergallery.com
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all
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Klee's Women's Pavilion (1921) 
Thursday, July 30, 2009, 08:24 AM - General
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In Women's Pavilion (1921), Paul Klee creates an archetypal landscape with otherworldly inhabitants. The ground for the painting is dark and mysterious like the night. There are olive greens and velvet black rectangles overlaid with golden pyramids and scraped shapes of emerald green. Trees with leaves of vivid yellow green and brilliant red, along with trunks of orange, yellow and light blue, comprise a magical wood.

Two bottle-like figures stand in the foreground. Their heads, like great peacock plumes, fan upward from their thick necks. Crossing their bodies, necks and heads and continuing all the way up the painting are thin, wavy horizontal dotted lines adding a crosswind effect to the piece.

In the center of the work is a rectangular window looking onto a pyramid of yet another dimension of intrigue.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery
www.sallyportergallery.com
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all

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Picasso's The Two Saltimbanques (Harlequin and His Companion), 1901 
Wednesday, July 29, 2009, 08:47 AM - General
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Picasso's The Two Saltimbanques (1901) features two lovers at a nice restaurant. There are white tablecloths on the tables and decorative moldings on the walls. They are snuggling closely in the booth enjoying two libations, perhaps an absinthe and a dark creme de cacao, served in glass stemware.

The couple is dressed for a night out, but at different places. She in her gold and orange long-sleeved dress blends in perfectly with the other restaurant patrons. He, however, is dressed for the stage and an adoring public, in his green skull cap and harlequin costume. He is playing his part.

She has a look of sad detachment with her down turned mouth as she rests her head on her hands. His nail biting suggests a bit of apprehension as they each look out across the room in opposite directions just waiting for someone to notice them.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery
www.sallyportergallery.com
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all
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Picasso's The Red Armchair, 1931 
Monday, July 27, 2009, 11:43 AM
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Picasso's The Red Armchair (1931) depicts a blond woman seated in a striped red chair. She is wearing a smart green dress with a fashionable black belt. She sits calmly enough in a purple and yellow room, complete with chair rail.

Upon looking closer, one realizes her arms are big, brown and strong, like a bear's arms. Perhaps she is wearing a fox tail stole, as her hands are replaced by pointy white and black ends. More oddly, Picasso has managed to paint a side profile of his own face with her front staring portrait. Is Picasso saying he is inside her head, identifying psychologically and emotionally, or is he expressing his desire for complete control? Regardless, she or "they" look completely content.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery
www.sallyportergallery.com
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all
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Bart Exposito & My New Work 
Saturday, July 25, 2009, 02:55 PM
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Bart Exposito, born in Texas & living in L.A., has a hard-edged graphic style comparable to Frank Stella's. You can view his work at Saatchi Online. The piece Cyclo is particulary compelling. Here is what that site has to say about Cyclo, "Exposito’s seamless painting style takes its lineage from 60s minimalism, where forms and materials were pared down to their bare essence. Exposito’s bold motifs draw from the aesthetic styles of this period, combining associations to hippy aspiration and retronostalgia with their contemporary revival as design elegance, suburban chic, and commodity glamour. In Cyclo, Exposito’s curved pattern beacons with the simplified and understated power of a type-font, referencing both the subtle beauty of calligraphic contour, and the indistinction between – and complete conjugation of – form and content."

Visually, the new pieces I am currently working on have something in common with Stella's and Exposito's work regarding form, but I go on to say something more. My works are based on incorporating pure pattern, as in pattern from a pattern and decoration book, but I am addressing content as the "idea" or "essence" of leaves. Passages about the brushstroke are conjoined with flat areas of paint. More updates to come.

Sally Porter

Sally Porter Gallery
www.sallyportergallery.com
http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sall ... ll/all/all


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